Battle of Glasgow

October 15, 1864

The battle of Glasgow began on this day. Four hundred Union soldiers and fifty Confederates lost their lives in this rebel victory.


Jimmy Doolittle Centerville Missouri Doolittle Missouri

October 11, 1946

In honor of the brave leader of the "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" Centerville (west of Rolla on Route 66) was re-named for the leader of the raid, St. Louis oil executive, Jimmy Doolittle. General Doolittle himself was there for the ceremony. 


Meramec River

October 10, 1700

A French missionary, Father Gravier, noted in his journal, "Discovered the river Mirameguoua, where the rich lead mine is situated, 12 or 13 leagues from its mouth." Today we refer to that river as the Meramec. "Meramec" (Mirameguoua) is an Osage word meaning catfish.


Overland Mail Butterfield Stage Pony Express Missouri

October 9, 1858

The first Overland Mail from California reached St. Louis. It was carried to the route terminus at Tipton and put on a train for St. Louis. The trip took almost 25 days. 


George Washington Carver

October 8, 1896

Missouri-born George Washington Carver taught his first class at Tuskegee Institute on this date.


Frank James

October 5, 1882

Frank James surrendered on the steps of the state capitol. He made a short speech and turned his gun over to the Governor. Read more about this in Tales From Missouri and the Heartland. 


Pony Express Stamp

October 4, 1814

Birthday of Alexander Majors of Westport, MO.  He was a co-founder of a huge freighting firm, the Overland Stage Co., and the Pony Express. Read more about him in Tales From Missouri and the Heartland.


Missouri State Fair

October 3, 1853

The very first state fair opened in Boonville. State fairs were held in Boonville until 1901.


St. Louis Cardinals 1926

October 2, 1926

It was the opening day of the World Series where St. Louis Cardinals faced off against the New York Yankees. This was the first World Series ever for the St. Louis Cardinals.  


Ozark Empire Fair

October 1, 1856

Greene County held its first of many fairs. The Southwest Missouri Fair lasted three days and drew people from many surrounding counties. Many visitors stayed for the entire event and brought tents for the evenings. Some even brought their servants. Today the event is called the Ozark Empire Fair.